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Analysis of the Relationship Between Student and Teacher
Attendance on Standardized Measures of Academic Achievement

Executive Summary

January 7, 1998

Investigating possible effects of student and teacher attendance on measures of student achievement required calculating individual student attendance rates for all students in the District as well as teacher attendance rates for all teachers in the District. Student attendance rate was calculated as the percentage of scheduled classes attended throughout the school year (1996-97). Teacher attendance was calculated as the percentage of instructional time attended throughout the year. Student academic achievement was measured using the Stanford 9.

An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to test for differences in academic achievement between students and teachers with good and poor attendance. Students and teachers were divided into two groups based on their attendance rates. Teachers with greater than 94% instructional time and less than 93% instructional time defined the upper and lower attendance groups respectively, and students with greater than 95% class time and less than 95% class time defined the upper and lower groups respectively.

A Comparison of achievement scores between students with high and low teacher absence rates yielded statistically significant differences. Students attending classes with high teacher attendance rates scored an average of two to three NCE points higher than students attending classes with low teacher attendance rates (Figure 1). Although students attending classes with high teacher attendance rates scored significantly higher in Reading, Mathematics and Language compared to students attending classes with low teacher attendance rates, the strength of association (correlation) was quite low between teacher attendance rate and student performance on the Stanford 9 (Table 1).

Comparing achievement scores between students with good and poor attendance rates produced more dramatic differences in student achievement compared to teacher attendance rates (Figure 2). In addition to larger mean differences in achievement scores, the strength of association between student attendance and achievement scores was also greater (Table 2).

The greatest differences in student achievement were found between students with poor attendance in classes with poor teacher attendance compared to students with good attendance attending classes with good teacher attendance (Figure 3).

Analysis of the relationship between student and teacher attendance rates and student achievement suggested that poor teacher attendance combined with poor student attendance yielded the lowest Stanford 9 scores followed by poor student attendance alone and poor teacher attendance alone. That is, poor teacher attendance alone appeared to have the smallest impact on student achievement.

The Appendix presents a roster of schools rank ordered on teacher attendance from highest to lowest average attendance rates.

Figure 1

ANOVA Results for Student Performance on the
Stanford 9 by Teacher Attendance (N = 29780)

Teacher

Stanford 9 (NCE)

Attendance

Reading

Mathematics

Language

High Attendance Group

49.37

48.04

46.71

Low Attendance Group

46.88

46.14

44.12

Table 1

Strength of Association Between Teacher Attendance
And Student Performance on the Stanford 9

N=28099

Variable

Stanford 9

 

Reading

Mathematics

Language

Teacher Attendance

.04 (.0016%)

.05 (.0025%)

.05 (.0025%)

Figure 2

ANOVA Results for Student Performance on the
Stanford 9 by Student Attendance (N = 36206)

Student

Stanford 9 (NCE)

Attendance

Reading

Mathematics

Language

High Attendance Group

50.66

50.62

48.38

Low Attendance Group

45.33

43.54

42.03

Table 2

Strength of Association Between Student Attendance
And Student Performance on the Stanford 9

Variable

Stanford 9

 

Reading

Mathematics

Language

Student Attendance

.16 (2.6%)

.20 (4.0%)

.18 (3.2%)

Figure 3

ANOVA Results for Student Performance on the
Stanford 9 by Student and Teacher Attendance (N = 15336)

Student & Teacher

Stanford 9 (NCE)

Attendance

Reading

Mathematics

Language

High Attendance Group

51.76

51.53

49.52

Low Attendance Group

44.25

42.76

40.84

Table 3

Strength of Association Between Student and Teacher
Attendance and Student Performance on the Stanford 9

Variable

Stanford 9 (NCE)

 

Reading

Mathematics

Language

Teacher Attendance

.11 (1.2%)

.14 (2.0%)

.13 (1.7%)

Student Attendance

.21 (4.4%)

.23 (5.3%)

.23 (5.3%)

Figure 4

ANOVA Results for Student Performance on the
Stanford 9 by Teacher and Student Attendance

Table 4

ANOVA Results for Student Performance on the Stanford 9
by Student Attendance and Teacher Attendance

Teachers

Student Attendance

Attendance

Upper Group

Lower Group

 

Reading

Math

Language

Reading

Math

Language

Upper Group

52.03

52.02

49.93

47.20

44.86

44.43

Lower Group

49.61

49.73

47.71

44.79

43.53

41.77

* All differences were statistically significant at (p < .05)

 Upper and lower groups refer to good and poor attendance groups respectively

Figure 5

Plot of the Interaction Between Student and
Teacher Attendance on Stanford 9 Reading Scores

Figure 6

Plot of the Interaction Between Student and
Teacher Attendance on Stanford 9 Math Scores

Upper and lower groups refer to good and poor attendance groups respectively

Figure 7

Plot of the Interaction Between Student and
Teacher Attendance on Stanford 9 Language Scores

   Upper and lower groups refer to good and poor attendance groups respectively

Appendix

Teacher Attendance by School
Rank Ordered from Highest to Lowest

School

Teacher Attendance

Homebound

99.6

Rincon Connection

98.9

Teleteaching

98.7

Jr. High Accommodations

98.3

Project MORE

97.6

Project PASS

97.3

PACE Alternative HS.

97.1

Southwest Alternative

97.0

Whitmore

95.9

Erickson

95.8

Ganoung

95.7

Richey

95.0

Roskruge

94.9

Wrightstown

94.8

Magee

94.8

Hughes

94.7

Lyons

94.7

Reynolds

94.7

Davis

94.6

Urquides

94.6

Howenstine

94.6

Menlo Park

94.5

Alternative 2 (TAP)

94.4

Hollinger

94.3

Maldonado

94.3

Pueblo Gardens

94.3

Rose

94.3

Palo Verde Magnet

94.3

Myers

94.2

Borman

94.1

Collier

94.1

Schumaker

94.1

Sabino

94.1

Johnson

93.9

Rogers

93.9

Doolen

93.9

Fickett Magnet

93.9

Manzo

93.8

Marshall

93.8

Robison

93.8

Wright

93.7

Lawrence

93.6

Miles - E. L. C.

93.6

School

Teacher Attendance

Van Horne

93.6

Mansfeld

93.6

SLIC

93.5

Kellond

93.5

Lynn

93.5

White

93.5

Secrist

93.5

Grijalva

93.4

Carson

93.4

Maxwell

93.4

Catalina Magnet

93.4

Dunham

93.3

SolengTom

93.3

Cholla Magnet

93.3

University

93.3

Davidson

93.2

Dietz

93.2

Smith

93.2

Van Buskirk

93.2

Wheeler

93.2

Valencia

93.2

Cavett

93.1

Sewell

93.1

Tully

93.0

Bonillas

92.8

Howell

92.8

Blenman

92.7

Duffy

92.7

Bilingual Magnet

92.7

Vesey

92.6

Henry

92.5

Tolson

92.5

Naylor

92.5

Safford Magnet

92.5

Pueblo Magnet

92.5

Sahuaro

92.5

Pistor

92.4

Tucson Magnet

92.3

Townsend

92.2

Corbett

92.0

Robins

91.9

Warren

91.9

Wakefield

91.8

Project RISE

91.8

Fort Lowell

91.7

Fruchthendler

91.7

Hudlow

91.7

Roberts

91.7

Steele

91.7

School

Teacher Attendance

Bloom

91.6

Mission View

91.6

Ochoa

91.4

Rincon

91.4

Cragin

91.2

Borton

91.1

Brichta

91.1

Keen

91.1

Carrillo

90.9

Gale

90.8

Utterback Magnet

90.8

Vail

90.6

Miller

90.4

Ford

90.2

Gridley

90.0

Santa Rita

89.8

Jefferson Park

89.6

Booth

89.2

Drachman

88.9

Dodge Magnet

88.5

Hohokam

88.4

Safford

87.2

Lineweaver

86.9

Holladay

84.4

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Last updated 2/14/06